Relative Links with IBM Cloud API Gateway

I work quite a bit with serverless tech, particularly on IBM Cloud since I work there. At the moment I'm building a microservice using web actions. When a user creates data with a POST request, I want to redirect them to the URL of the new thing they created - but for that I need to know the URL that it was accessed with. This is a relatively new feature on API Gateway so here's a quick howto for grabbing that URL in both JavaScript and PHP. Continue reading

Deploying OpenWhisk Actions With Dependencies

I mostly use OpenWhisk with NodeJS (which is lucky for me, it's the best supported of the languages and default for the documentation examples!) and while there are a bunch of npm modules already installed on OpenWhisk, sometimes there will be others that you also want to include. Alternatively or additionally, you might also want to deploy your package.json since this can specify the entry point if it's not index.js which is the default.

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Building Conversations With Alexa

Having an Amazon Echo Dot in my office is quite fun, and I've accidentally started writing more skills and giving a few talks about building skills for the Alexa toolchain. Today I created a skill that uses multiple steps to make a conversation and thought I'd better write down what I did so I'd be able to remember!

The basic idea is that when creating the "intent", i.e. the action that you want Alexa to do, you also define "slots". The slots are the variables; if this were a command line tool, they'd be the arguments you typed. It's possible to include both intent and slots in your wording when you speak to Alexa, but equally you can just invoke the skill and have it prompt you for the rest of the information. Continue reading

Package Parameters in OpenWhisk

I love OpenWhisk but I struggled a little to get the parameters attached in a sane way for a while so I am capturing my notes here for future reference! Parameters can be attached to actions or packages; I tend to break my actions down really small and pass data into them, while preferring to set parameters on the package that the actions belong to. Continue reading

One OpenWhisk Action Calls Another

Working with openwhisk, it's easy to create many isolated actions and build them up into sequences; the output of one action is passed to the next action in the sequence. In my case, I wanted one action to spawn potentially many other actions. I had to look up how to do it and here it is so I can look it up more quickly next time! Continue reading

One-Line Command For Newest OpenWhisk Logs

One of my current project uses OpenWhisk, which is an open source serverless technology stack. IBM has it on their Bluemix platform, and since I work there, I get to play with it as much as I like! One thing that did seem clunky is that it takes more than one step to get the logs of the most recent function run via commandline - first you list the activations, then you request the logs of the activation you're interested in. Of course, when you're developing, that's usually the most recent one so here's my shortcut for that:

wsk activation list -l1 | tail -n1 | cut -d ' ' -f1 | xargs wsk activation logs

From left to right, sections separated by the pipe | character, this is what happens:

  • get a list of activations, limited to just one activation (it sorts the newest one first by default)
  • grab only the last line of that output (there's some extra titles and stuff in there)
  • use the `cut` command with the space character as a field delimiter, and use only the first field (this gets the ID of the activation)
  • get the logs of that activation

Of course it's wrapped up in a script so I just run that from the commandline and check where I went wrong this time ...

Alexa, When's the Bus?

I got an Amazon Echo for my birthday (from my husband, who took romantic to a new level when he liked my present so much he bought me an Amazon dot a week later so he could use the echo elsewhere in the house!), which is a new gadget for us. Of course I started asking her questions that she couldn't answer ... and you can write your own "skills" so of course I sat down to browse the documentation and ended up creating a working skill for her :) It was a fun process but there were lots of unfamiliar parts to it so I thought I'd blog what I did in case anyone else wants to try out creating skills as well, and in case I ever want to remember some of the stuff I know now!

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